What Makes a Mala?

You've probably seen a mala before. We carry a beautiful selection of them in the shop even. What may just appear to be necklace style popular among yogis and Frankie Bergstein is actually a powerful tool made with care and carries so much purpose and intention. If you've ever been curious about what the heck a mala really is anyway then you've come to the right place!

I'm relatively new to malas myself and wanted to really figure out what their purpose was, what makes one different from another aside from style and I quickly learned that they are so much more than just a string of beautiful beads! Mala Necklaces, also called Buddhist prayer beads, are beads traditionally used in prayer and meditation practices. Each mala is unique and will have special significance to its owner. They are meant to act as a physical reminder of a mantra or intention, and thought to bring the wearer the healing properties of those unique stones and beads.

If there is something you would like to focus on, or bring more intention to in your life; perhaps self love, patience, or adventure to just name a few, then a mala can serve as a great daily reminder for you.

shanti collective mala necklace

At first glance most malas may look relatively similar to one another, brown beads, a tassel or a stone, all strung together to create a long necklace. But every bead on a mala is chosen for a purpose. Gemstone beads and pendants are often added to malas because specific stones are thought to harness specific energies. A few examples include rose quartz for self love, Jade for balance, Moonstone for intuition, and white howlite for stress relief. 

The beads themselves in malas are equally important. Rudraksha seeds are a very common bead used in malas. Rudraksha Trees are abundant in India, Bali, and Nepal.The seeds of the tree are thought to hold healing power and positive energy in Hindu and Buddhist religion. Sandalwood and rose wood beads are other common choices.

 shanti collective mala beads

If you struggle to clear you mind during meditation or even just finding quiet moments in your day then a mala is a wonderful tool for those times a well. It can be used to keep your hands occupied during meditation, you can even choose to recite a mantra on every bead. If you do not wish to wear your mala, you could keep it near you, or in a special place - somewhere you will see it everyday to keep your affirmations in mind.

This is barely scratching the surface of what makes a mala! If you're itching for more info, Picot is hosting a Mala making workshop April 1st. If you're interested in creating a Mala of your own this is a perfect opportunity to learn from an expert (not me)! Rachel of Shanti Collective will be teaching how to create your own mala, which stones and beads best match your chosen intention and how to use your mala during meditation. Check out the event page for more info on this workshop

 

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